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Jim Fitzpartick
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NHS

12 Sep

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Jim Fitzpatrick MP supports appeal for families in Poplar and Limehouse to have a lifesaving talk during Organ Donation Week

September 12, 2017 | By | No Comments

Jim Fitzpatrick is proudly supporting Organ Donation Week and an appeal for their constituents to talk about organ donation.

33,108 people in Poplar and Limehouse are on the NHS Organ Donor Register but hundreds of lifesaving transplants are being missed around the country every year because families don’t know what their relative wanted.

During the week, NHS Blood and Transplant, hospitals, charities and supporters of organ donation are encouraging people across the UK to talk about organ donation with their relatives and friends.

Jim said:

“I’m proud to support this lifesaving appeal and it’s really easy for everyone to take part – just have a chat.

“That chat might be the next time you sit down for a meal, when you are shopping or working, or when you are just driving in the car. If you want to be a donor, your family’s agreement is still needed for donation to go ahead, even if you are on the NHS Organ Donor Register.”

Families who agree to donate say it helps with their grief and that they feel enormous sense of pride at knowing their relative gave others the chance of a new beginning.

Fiona Loud, Policy Director of Kidney Care UK, commented:

“At least one person dies every single day whilst waiting for a kidney transplant and of the 22 people on the waiting list in Poplar and Limehouse, around 90% of them are waiting for a kidney. You are more likely to need a transplant than to be a donor so please, this Organ Donation Week, just take a few minutes to have a think about what you would do if you needed a transplant, and have that life-saving chat with your family so they know your wishes.”

Anthony Clarkson, Assistant Director of Organ Donation and Transplantation at NHS Blood and Transplant, said:

“We are really grateful for Jim’s support because hundreds of lives are being lost every year.

“This Organ Donation Week, tell your family you want to save lives.  A few words now can make an extraordinary difference.

“If you are unsure about donation, please ask yourselves as a family; what would you do if one of you needed a transplant?  Would you accept a life-saving organ? If you’d take an organ, shouldn’t you be prepared to donate?”

There is a particular need for more black and Asian people to talk about donation. Patients from ethnic minority communities make up 29% of the national transplant waiting list but people from these communities are less likely to agree to donate. Organs from people from the same ethnic background are more likely to be a close match and give the best chance of a positive outcome.

13 Jul

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United Against Dementia in Parliament

July 13, 2017 | By | No Comments

This week I attended an Alzheimer’s Society event for parliamentarians to learn more about the issues affecting people with dementia. There are 850,000 people suffering from dementia in the UK and 1,088 estimated to be living with the disease in the Tower Hamlets Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) area.

Having dementia can have a devastating impact and could happen to any one of us, in any community. That is why we must all act to tackle dementia.

There is currently no cure, and very few effective treatments. Funding for dementia research has lagged behind that of other major health conditions such as cancer or heart disease. In recent years progress has been made, with £250million investment committed to the establishment of the world’s first dementia research institute. But we still have a long way to go until we find a cure and understand how to care for people living with the disease.

The previous Labour Government launched the first ever national dementia strategy, appointed the first national clinical directors for dementia, and commissioned the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to develop the quality standard for dementia. Together, those began the process of establishing memory clinics, providing better training for GPs and improving the quality of dementia care for people in hospital.

As we work to find a cure for dementia I believe we should place an equal emphasis on the care provided to people living with disease and the support provided to their families and carers. I am concerned that the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services reports that £4.6 billion has been cut from adult social care budgets and that 300,000 fewer people are receiving publicly funded services than in 2009-10.

At the General Election, the Labour manifesto committed to establish a National Care Service, backed up by an additional £8 billion for social care budgets, in order to build capacity to move quickly towards a joined-up service, provide care closer to home, and deliver a 21st century health system.

If you are personally affected by dementia then please visit Alzheimer’s Society’s dementia connect website where you can find the services they provide near you. Or you can call their helpline on 0300 222 11 22.

24 Nov

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Jim Fitzpatrick MP urges eye clinics not to cancel constituents’ appointments

November 24, 2016 | By | No Comments

Jim Fitzpatrick recently attended the Royal National Institute of Blind People’s (RNIB) parliamentary reception to find out if time is running out for his constituents with conditions that can lead to sight loss.

Eye clinics that cancel appointments put their patients at risk of irreversible sight loss because many treatments for sight-threatening conditions require frequent follow-up appointments.

RNIB is campaigning for patients to be seen by eye clinics in the time advised by their consultant, and for patients to keep their appointments.

Jim said:

“I support RNIB’s campaign to make sure people are given timely eye clinic appointments. I’ll work with RNIB to ensure people in Poplar and Limehouse receive their treatment on time.”

Sally Harvey, RNIB’s Acting Chief Executive, said:

“Patients must be seen by their eye clinic within an appropriate time for their condition. No-one should lose their sight needlessly because their eye clinic was too busy to treat them on time.

Patients can also help themselves by attending their eye clinic appointment and not miss or cancel them. Doing so puts their sight at risk, prevents other patients being given timely appointments, and costs the NHS money.”

For more information you can call the RNIB Helpline on 0303 123 9999 or visit www.rnib.org.uk

21 Nov

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Local MP calls for greater Meningitis vaccine take-up

November 21, 2016 | By | No Comments

Jim Fitzpatrick MP is taking a leading role in a campaign to help protect young people’s health in Poplar and Limehouse.

He has signed up to promote meningitis awareness and vaccine take-up with GPs following a Parliamentary reception organised by charity Meningitis Now.

The charity is campaigning to increase the take-up of the lifesaving Men ACWY vaccine, which is available free to first-time university students up to the age of 25.

Jim said: “The low uptake of the Men ACWY vaccine among this at-risk group of young people is very worrying.

“I don’t want to see anyone in my constituency dying because they didn’t know about or didn’t get around to getting this vaccination.

“As we enter the peak season for bacterial meningitis I’ll be writing to local GP practices and university leaders to urge them to do more to promote awareness and encourage improved take-up.”

Following an increase of 809 per cent in meningococcal (group W) meningitis cases in the past five years around the country, Government launched a vaccination programme to protect young people aged 14 to 15 through schools and those aged 17 to 18 and first-year students up to 25 through GPs and clinics.

Despite the increasing risk to students and the recent deaths of a number of them across the UK, the uptake of the Men ACWY vaccine within this vulnerable age group remains very low, with just 17.4 per cent taking up the vaccine in England, and similar levels across Wales and Northern Ireland.

Jim has pledged to support the charity in its awareness-raising work and will be writing to GPs and university leaders locally to encourage them to do more to persuade young people to take up the vaccination.

“It is vitally important that students protect themselves with the Men ACWY vaccine and learn the signs and symptoms of the disease,” Jim added. “It only takes a few minutes and it could save theirs or their friend’s life.”

Liz Brown, chief executive of Meningitis Now, said: “We welcome Jim Fitzpatrick’s strong stand and support in persuading GPs to encourage students to protect themselves.”

Up to a quarter of students carry the bacteria that can cause meningitis compared to one in ten of the general population. Over 12 per cent of all cases occur in the 14 to 24 age group, with first year students being at particular risk.

Meningitis Now, in its 30th anniversary year this year, is working towards a future where no one in the UK loses their life to meningitis and everyone affected gets the support they need.

It does this by funding research into vaccines and prevention, raising awareness so people know what to look for and what action to take if they suspect meningitis and rebuilding futures by providing dedicated support to people living with the impact of the disease.

For more information on meningitis and the work of Meningitis Now visit: www.meningitisnow.org

18 Nov

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MP joins Heart Rhythm Charity call for screening of people at risk of atrial fibrillation (AF)

November 18, 2016 | By | No Comments

More than 500,000 people have undiagnosed AF, with more than 11,000 people per year suffering an AF-related stroke- 9% of all ischaemic strokes are caused by unknown AF.

Jim Fitzpatrick, MP for Poplar and Limehouse has pledged to work with the Arrhythmia Alliance and its sister organization, AF Association, to demand the creation of a national screening programme for people over 65 at risk of AF. Currently, more than 500,000 people have undiagnosed AF and are at an increased risk of suffering an AF-related stroke.

At a Know Your Pulse event held in Parliament hosted by the Arrhythmia Alliance and AF Association on Wednesday 16th November, Jim Fitzpatrick MP signed a pledge calling on the UK National Screening Committee to reverse its previous recommendation and to endorse a commissioned National Screening Programme for People over 65 years of age at risk of AF.

This event raised awareness of the importance of a simple manual pulse rhythm check in helping to detect AF, Parliamentarians who attended had a pulse check and an ECG hand-held recording.

Trudie Lobban MBE, Founder & CEO, Arrhythmia Alliance, who hosted the event, said:

“Manual pulse rhythm checks are already mandated in the NHS Health Check but are not being offered to patients by many healthcare professionals, which is why we are calling for a commissioned National Screening Programme for AF. A manual pulse check, is so simple to do, takes less than a minute and does not cost the NHS – but the benefits in preventing AF-related strokes and unnecessary deaths are enormous. Everyone needs to be aware of their pulse and how to manually check for an irregular rhythm.”

Jim Fitzpatrick MP added:

“I was shocked to hear about the numbers of people walking around today completely unaware that they have AF and who could be at risk of a debilitating or life-threatening AF-related stroke. I fully endorse the work of the Arrhythmia Alliance and AF Association and their call for a national screening programme. The pulse rhythm check I had taken showed just how simple and easy it is to identify someone who may have AF.”

AF is the most common heart rhythm abnormality, and is associated with a third of ischaemic strokes, which are typically more severe and debilitating for the patient. Data from stroke registries show that both unknown and untreated or under treated AF is responsible for most of these strokes. The tragedy is that most could be prevented if efforts were directed towards detection of AF before stroke occurs, through screening or case finding, and the provision of oral anticoagulant medications to prevent clots being formed in the heart, dislodging to be carried to an artery of the brain, blocking the circulation and causing an AF-related stroke.

For more information about the Arrhythmia Alliance and AF Association or to sign the pledge, please go to: www.heartrhythmalliance.org

 

02 Nov

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Jim Fitzpatrick joined politicians from across London to pledge support for London’s Air Ambulance

November 2, 2016 | By | No Comments

MPs, Peers and GLA members gathered in Parliament on Tuesday to congratulate the charity on winning the Pride of Britain Emergency Services award.

Advanced trauma doctors and paramedics also attended and set up medical demonstrations so guests could try out life-saving medical treatment on realistic dummies.

Politicians were also able to meet the helicopter pilots, fire crew and former patients at the event, hosted by London MPs Rushanara Ali (Labour) and Boris Johnson (Conservative) – key supporters of the charity.

Welcoming guests to the event Rushanara Ali said:

“It’s wonderful to celebrate the tireless work London’s Air Ambulance does to support people across our city.”

Rushanara explained to the guests that London’s Air Ambulance had been named winner at this year’s Daily Mirror Pride of Britain Awards, which were broadcast on ITV on Tuesday night. The charity was recognised for its use of a ground-breaking procedure on patient Vicky– known as REBOA (Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta) – to prevent patients from bleeding to death after major trauma. She introduced a video showing the procedure being performed on Vicky, her constituent, who also attended the reception.

Dr Anne Weaver, Emeritus Doctor with London’s Air Ambulance then spoke to the room of over 100 guests to explain why the charity plays such a crucial role, and what politicians can do to support:

“Trauma is the biggest killer in under 45s, even in children. So we deliver the hospital to the roadside, to our patients, when they need it most. We work alongside our NHS partners, Barts Health Trust and the London Ambulance Service to improve the outcome for so many people whose deaths are preventable.

“London’s Air Ambulance is there for the 10 million people who live and work in London. As influencers in your constituencies please do what you can to help us serve London and spread the message we are a charity.”

Speaking about the House of Commons event, CEO of London’s Air Ambulance, Charles Newitt said:

“This was our most successful Parliamentary Reception with a high turnout of politicians from across London and across the political parties. It was a pleasure to be able to meet with them, explain more about our charity, and receive their pledges of support.”

Since the charity started in 1989, it has treated more than 35,000 patients. Some of those former patients met their local MP at the event to share their stories. All London MPs and Assembly members were invited to the reception, as well as any politicians with an interest in health or charities.

For more information on the charity and the incredibly vital work they do, visit: https://londonsairambulance.co.uk/ 

01 Nov

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Action on heart disease ‘vital’ declares Jim Fitzpatrick

November 1, 2016 | By | No Comments

Jim Fitzpatrick Member of Parliament for Poplar and Limehouse, attended a Heart Valve Voice Parliamentary reception today to launch a new report by the charity which sets out a 2020 vision for tackling heart valve disease in the UK. Parliamentarians were joined at the charity’s event by patients, leading clinicians and senior NHS leaders including Professor Huon Gray, the National Clinical Director for Heart Disease.

Heart Valve Voice’s report, Towards a Heart Healthy Future, brings together a range of new evidence and data on heart valve disease and highlights the significant under-diagnosis and under-treatment of the condition and the variation in access to services which exists for patients in different parts of the country.

Event attendees heard from leading experts about the importance of improving outcomes for heart valve disease patients, including tackling the low diagnosis and treatment rates in the UK. They also found out about the report recommendations which the charity says are key if patient outcomes are to be improved and if the UK is to be brought into line with other comparable countries in terms of access to services and timely and effective treatment.

Commenting on the event Jim Fitzpatrick said:

“I was pleased to attend the launch of the Heart Valve Voice report “Towards a Heart Healthy Future: A 2020 Vision for Heart Valve Disease” in the House of Commons today. The number of people with heart valve disease in the UK is increasing but many people are not being diagnosed early enough, when treatment could mean they return to a normal life expectancy.

“Given the UK’s ageing population it is vital that the variation in access to heart valve disease services and treatment is addressed to improve patient outcomes but also to ensure longer-term savings for the NHS.”

Heart Valve Voice Chief Executive Wil Woan added:

“For too long now heart valve disease has not received the prioritisation it deserves. Whilst we have seen significant progress in the treatment and management of other cardiovascular conditions in the UK in recent years, this sadly has not been the case for heart valve disease.”

“We were delighted to have Jim at the launch of our latest report in Parliament today. We look forwarding to continuing to work together to see the recommendations in the report implemented in order to improve the diagnosis, treatment and care of heart valve disease patients across the UK.”

You can read the report in full here and for more information visit: http://www.heartvalvevoice.com/

 

13 Oct

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Jim Fitzpatrick shows support for people living with incurable secondary breast cancer

October 13, 2016 | By | No Comments

Jim Fitzpatrick met with Breast Cancer Care in Parliament on Wednesday 12th October to pledge his support for the charity’s campaign to ensure people with incurable secondary breast cancer no longer get second-rate care.

A survey of people with incurable breast cancer by Breast Cancer Care revealed just over a fifth (21%) of people who previously had breast cancer are first treated by their GP for another condition. And more than four in 10 (42%) do not feel their overall care is well-managed and well-coordinated. This suggests people living with incurable breast cancer are not getting the care and support they need.

In addition, a report from the charity reveals that, despite it being mandatory since 2013, a fifth (19%) of Hospital Trusts are not collecting any data about the number of people diagnosed with incurable breast cancer. And almost half (47%) are not recording the numbers fully.

Breast Cancer Care believes incomplete data for the number of people with incurable breast cancer is one of the major barriers to urgently needed improvements to poor care.

Ahead of Secondary Breast Cancer Awareness Day, Jim attended Breast Cancer Care’s parliamentary event – hosted by Sharon Hodgson MP, co-chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Breast Cancer and new Shadow Public Health Minister – to meet women living with incurable breast cancer and call for an end to second-rate care.

Jim said:

“It is so important to show my support for women living with incurable secondary breast cancer. It is absolutely vital that this Breast Cancer Awareness Month people with incurable breast cancer are not forgotten.

“I am calling on the Government to do more to support women and men affected by incurable breast cancer and make vital improvements to care.”

Danni Manzi, Head of Policy and Campaigns at Breast Cancer Care, says:

“We are extremely grateful to Jim Fitzpatrick for joining us ahead of Secondary Breast Cancer Awareness Day to show his support for our Secondary. Not second rate. campaign, improving care for incurable secondary breast cancer patients.

“There are still gaps in care for people with incurable breast cancer and consistent data collection is essential to enable crucial services and support to be planned effectively for people living with the disease.

“We are calling on the Government, Public Health England and NHS England to do all they can to ensure everyone with incurable breast cancer gets the best care possible.”

When time is uncertain, women with secondary breast cancer need to be certain of your support. Act today to improve care, visit: breastcancercare.org.uk/secondary

13 Oct

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“It’s Time to give a voice to Children who have been abused”

October 13, 2016 | By | No Comments

It’s Time to stand up for children who have been abused and get them the crucial support they need, Jim Fitzpatrick MP has said.

More than 30,000 people signed the NSPCC’s It’s Time petition calling on the Department of Health and NHS England to count children who have been abused and are in need of mental health support.

At the moment, it’s difficult to work out who needs help and how to commission services to help young people. This means some children are left without any help at all.

Every year the equivalent of two children in every primary school class experience abuse. Research has found up to 90 per cent of children who are abused at an early age will develop mental health problems by the time they are 18.

The charity’s petition is aimed at counting the number of children who’ve been abused and need support in a bid to deal with the gap in crucial mental health services.

Jim attended an NSPCC event in Parliament on Monday, October 10, hosted by Macclesfield MP David Rutley, to support the It’s Time campaign and to meet with young people who shared why the campaign matters to them.

It’s Time has already made important progress:

  • Over 16,000 supporters contacted their MP to raise the profile of support for children who have been abused
  • Nearly half of the Police and Crime Commissioners who were elected in May pledged to use their victim’s fund to improve support for children and young people who have been abused
  • The Education Select Committee supported our call for children entering care to receive an automatic mental health assessment from a trained professional

Jim Fitzpatrick said:

“We tend to take it for granted that the Government has data on everything that is important.

“But right now, they are not counting the number of children who have been abused and need support.

“We need ‎this data so that the current gap in services can be addressed, to ensure children get the therapeutic services they need to help them overcome the trauma of their abuse.”

Peter Wanless, NSPCC CEO, said:

“If we don’t know exactly how many children are missing out, we can’t do everything we can to help. So it’s essential we find out.

“We know how life-changing the right support can be. It can make the difference between a life defined by abuse or a child reaching their potential.

“So we have handed to No. 10 Downing Street this petition calling on the Government to collect local data from health professionals, social workers and the police, on the number of children who need help.

“It’s time to stand up for children who have been abused. It’s time to give them a voice.”

28 Sep

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Jim Fitzpatrick MP shows support for National Air Ambulance Week

September 28, 2016 | By | No Comments

NAAW ran from 19th to 25th September- an initiative created by the Association of Air Ambulances (AAA) and celebrates the work of local air ambulance charities, giving them a national voice and an opportunity to promote the work they do at a local level. Together, the UK’s air ambulance charities raise £120 million a year, operate 37 helicopters, have a volunteer network of over 2,500 people and are one of the most exciting and innovative group of organisations in the UK.

London’s Air Ambulance treats on average five critically injured people in London each day, performing medical interventions at the roadside which are normally only found in a hospital emergency department. Barts Health NHS Trust provide the doctors and some financial support and the London Ambulance Service provides the paramedics and the emergency infrastructure to dispatch the service. The charity relies heavily on voluntary donations and has a world class reputation for delivering clinical innovation and excellence at the roadside. Since its inception 28 years ago, London’s Air Ambulance has treated over 35,000 patients.

The MP for Poplar & Limehouse said:

“I am proud to support London’s Air Ambulance. They provide a unique service to London by bringing the hospital to the patient.  In the first 6 months of the year alone 39 people in Tower Hamlets have already been treated by London’s Air Ambulance.”

Charles Newitt, Interim CEO of London’s Air Ambulance, said:

“National Air Ambulance Week is the ideal time to release our new infographic with data from the first 6 months of this year. It serves to highlight the work that we do, all across London, all day, and all year. We want everyone in London to know that we are there for them, should they need our help and that as a charity we can’t operate without the donations of those that live and work in London.

“National Air Ambulance Week is a week when air ambulance charities across the UK rally together to raise awareness and funds in their local communities. I am urging people to get involved during National Air Ambulance Week in any way you can to support us. Your support is vital in saving lives.”

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Jim Fitzpatrick MP